Artist/photographer Research – Bill Brandt

After reaching a turning point with my last shoot (four), I decided to do some research on historically well know nude photographer Bill Brandt. I have always had an interest in German/british photographer Bill Brandt, ever since I was introduced to his work back when I was producing my A-Level exam images.

I find Brandt’s simplistic stance to the composition of his frames mesmerisingly powerful. They hold all the relevant subject matter that Brandt wish’s to share with the viewer, and yet the imagery remains holding the viewers attention as they try to digest and reconfigure the subject matter so that, over all they can step away from the work and have a grasp of the information that the frame held. This is a very powerful way of utilising the control as the photographer, that we have over the photographic composition of imagery and the vantage point from which the subject matter is shot, these two key aspects of image making are really key to creating interesting, captivating artefacts that will hold viewers attention.

During World War two Brandt excelled with his portraiture and landscape work, it was only after peace was restored that he began his nude series. From the some of the articles that I have read on Brandt, it is clear to see that many of his works hold an important social commentary, alongside a poetic resonance. Many critics of his works write about how his landscapes and nudes are dynamic, intense and powerful, all of which I agree with. I find it interesting that he introduced levels of wide-angle lenses, adding a slightly distortion effect to the frames that was capturing

Whilst researching about Brandt I spent a great deal of time on his website – http://www.billbrandt.com/indexxx.html

From the website (above) I found this great quoter from Brandt, that I find really inspirational, “When I began to photograph nudes, I let myself be guided by this camera, and instead of photographing what I saw, I photographed what the camera was seeing. I interfered very little, and the lens produced anatomical images and shapes which my eyes had never observed”.This is a great quote that, the anatomical images and shapes part of this quote is very interesting.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under 352MC -Professional Photographic Practice, 3rd Year

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s